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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Resolves With Chiropractic Care

The April 18, 2013 issue of the Journal of Upper Cervical Chiropractic Research highlights a study involving a 32 year-old woman who experienced a resolution of her Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) after beginning chiropractic care.

Study author Jason Nardi, DC, reported that when she first came to the chiropractor, the woman complained of loose, painful, runny stools upon waking every day with abdominal pain and bloating that started ten year earlier. She was also suffering from depression that began three years previous and anxiety that began ten years prior. Both were diagnosed four years earlier and were being managed medically.

She also reported being in two motor vehicle accidents, one at the age of 10 and the second at the age of 21. The first one resulted in her being in a coma for three days and the second one resulted in a fractured pelvis.

Her chiropractic examination found numerous postural abnormalities and decreased ranges of motion in her neck with right rotation and lateral bending. An SF-36 Health Survey was used to measure her outcomes.

Her x-rays revealed a subluxation of the C1 vertebra, the topmost one in the spine.

On her second visit, she reported that the morning after her first adjustment she experienced a solid, pain-free bowel movement that has continued since. She also reported being in a better mood and have less anxiety when faced with her normal triggers.

She reported continued improvement over the next three months. At that time, a second SF-36 questionnaire was completed. Her Mental Component improved from 40% to 53%, General Health improved from 57% to 72% and Mental Health improved from 72% to 84%.

The author concludes, in this patient's case, a subluxation "appears to cause neurological interference resulting in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. This change in neurology could possibly change the chemical and electrical signals to the [intestinal] nervous system."

He goes on to say that correcting the subluxation at this level restores proper neurological function and thereby proper function of the gastro-intestinal tract.